Arts

Gordon Downie sings in Hamilton, one of the stops in The Hip's 2016 tour. Photo by TKN's Joyce Grant.
Arts Entertainment News

This Summer, Canada Had A Sing-A-Long

Recently, people across Canada came together in a unique and emotional musical experience.

Canadians said thank-you and good-bye to the iconic rock band, The Tragically Hip.

Many Canadians have enjoyed the unique Canadian sound of the band for many years. In fact, some people say the band plays “the soundtrack of Canada” and the “music that is in Canadians’ hearts.” Of course, not every Canadian enjoys the music of The Hip, as they’re known, but a great many do.

Maya Angelou. Image: Adria Richards
Arts News

Maya Angelou’s Work Will Live On

The current president of the United States named his daughter after her.

Her friends included civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., famous choreographer Alvin Ailey, singer Billie Holiday, talk show host Oprah Winfrey and former U.S. president Bill Clinton and she influenced millions around the world.

The chandelier that was created out of the Maple Tree Forever Project. Image: BROTHERS DRESSLER
Arts Environment News

This Famous Maple Tree Will Live… Forever

In 1867 when Canada was created, a towering Silver Maple tree standing in front of Alexander Muir’s house in Toronto gave him an idea.

He would write a poem and a song about the majestic tree, so common in Canada and so symbolic, to celebrate Canada’s confederation.

His song was called The Maple Leaf Forever and it has been the unofficial Canadian anthem to this day.

This figure is a central character in the window called "Art of the Deal." Image: John Kernaghan.
Arts News

Empty Storefronts Now Showcase Art

There is a strip of vacant stores along Eglinton Ave. W. in Toronto.

The street in front of the stores is under construction.

The stores are vacant (there is no one using them) partly because of the construction, which makes it hard for people to visit the stores to shop. And if there are no shoppers, there’s no point in opening a store.

But Toronto businessman John Kernaghan looked at the vacant storefronts and saw possibilities.