Tag: government

News Politics

Liberals Win Majority In Quebec

Voters in the province of Quebec made their feelings known on Monday, giving the Liberal party a majority government.

Majority means the Liberals got more votes than all of the other parties put together.

The Liberals beat the main rival, the Parti Quebecois, led by Pauline Marois.

Pauline Marois. Image: Wikipedia
News Politics

Liberals Likely To Win Quebec Election: Poll

Quebec residents are gearing up for a provincial election on Monday.

The four leading parties that want to form the province’s government are Coalition Avenir Québec, Québec Solidaire, Liberal Party of Quebec, and the ruling party–the Parti Québécois (PQ)–led by Premier Pauline Marois.

The most up-to-date poll conducted by Ipsos Reid for CTV News shows that the Liberals are likely going to win the election.

John Wright, Senior Vice-President of Ipsos Global told Teaching Kids News that, “The election is only days away and while the outcome for the Liberals forming the next government appears likely, we can’t predict if it will be a minority or a majority result and that’s what makes the final days so interesting to watch.”

Lejac Residential School at Fraser Lake in 1920. Image: Wikimedia
News Politics

Residential Schools Hearings Wrap Up

A commission that will document one of the darkest periods in Canada’s history is wrapping up and will report on its findings next year.

Since 2010, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been gathering information from First Nations, Inuit and Metis people who were forced to take part in Canada’s “residential (boarding) schools” program.

News

Is It Okay To Work For No Money?

Many companies train young people through an “internship.”

An unpaid internship is when someone (usually a student) learns a job by working at a company, but doesn’t get paid. Instead of money, they get training and experience.

Two popular Canadian magazines have been told by the government that they must stop offering unpaid internships.

Boy voting in mock election; image: A boy votes in a "mock election" outside the Russian embassy in Ottawa. Image: Chrystia Chudczak, www.chrystiachudczak.com.
Breaking News News Politics

Crimea Has The World’s Attention

Some events are happening in Crimea and the world is taking notice of them.

The small peninsula of Crimea, attached to the country of Ukraine, sits in the middle of Europe. Crimea is about half the size of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia; about two million people live there.

Crimea is at the centre of a major political battle between Russia and Ukraine. The rest of world is watching that conflict closely.

News Politics

New Rules To Become A Canadian Citizen

People who were not born in Canada may have to follow new rules to become Canadian citizens.

A new bill has been put forward that increases the length of time people must be physically in Canada before they can apply for citizenship.

They can’t say they live in Canada and then spend too much time outside the country.

The government says they want people to have direct experience of what it’s like to live in Canada, before they become a citizen.

The new rules extend the age for being able to speak and understand one of Canada’s official languages.

Previously, people 18 to 54 had to speak English or French and pass a Canadian knowledge test with the help of an interpreter.

Image: Andrijko Z.
News Politics

How Would You Change The Senate?

What would you do with the Canadian Senate? Change the way Senators are chosen? Get rid of it? Keep it as-is?

The Senate is a legislative body of the government that has almost the same powers as the House of Commons.

However, members to the House of Commons are elected; the prime minister appoints Senators.

And these tend to be people from his own party, who have done good things for his party.

Once they are in the Senate, they almost always vote as their party does in the House of Commons.

The Senate was started this way in 1867 when Canada was formed.

It was supposed to be a place for “sober second thought”—thinking carefully about the laws sent to it by the House of Commons and sometimes improving them.