Post Tagged with: "animals"

Image: snowmanradio

Bees Go Buzz… Or Sum Sum… Or Vizzz

We all know that a pig says “oink” and a cow says “moo,” right?

Well, that’s true if you live in North America and you speak English.

But what about in other countries and languages? Do animals say different things?

by · June 24, 2014 · Animals, News
A reconstructed skeleton of Argentinosaurus huinculensis, which is in the Titanosaur group. Image: Eva K.

World’s Biggest Dinosaur Found

Scientists have uncovered the fossilized bones of what may be the largest dinosaur that ever existed.

by · May 22, 2014 · Animals, News
Image: Exlbris

Deer Shuts Down Major Highway

A deer shut down one of Canada’s major highways on the Monday afternoon of a holiday weekend.

The young doe had apparently been scared out of the woods by a dog. It ended up walking along the busy highway.

by · May 21, 2014 · Animals, News, Science
Quanto was killed in the line of duty. Image: CTV

Brave Dogs, Smart Cat In Animal Hall Of Fame

Five incredible animals have been entered into the Purina Animal Hall of Fame for 2014.

by · May 7, 2014 · Animals, Lighter, News
Image: André Karwath

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes?

A new study answers a question people have long asked themselves about the animal kingdom: Why do zebras have stripes?

If you want to try guessing the answer, stop reading now.

Have you guessed? OK, start reading again.

According to a new study, a zebra’s stripes most likely help to keep annoying, biting flies off them.

Scientists have thought that might be the reason.

However, they also had other theories: that the stripes provide camouflage to help them hide from enemies; to confuse their enemies; to help them stay cool; or for a social reason such as to attract a mate.

by · April 9, 2014 · Animals, Science
Image: Joe Robertson

Endangered Animals Making A Comeback In Canada

Seven Canadian species that were once considered endangered or nearly extinct are beginning to flourish again, thanks to efforts by conservationists.

Canadian Geographic magazine reported in its December 2013 issue that populations of endangered whooping cranes, North Pacific humpback whales, eastern wild turkeys, swift foxes, sea otters, wood bison and peregrine falcons have increased in recent years.

Most of them are no longer considered endangered.

Several factors contributed to the disappearance of these species, including loss of habitat, pesticides, disease and over-hunting.

by · January 6, 2014 · Animals, News, Science
This chocolate-colored "cocoa" frog may be a new discovery. Image: Stuart V Nielsen

Scientists Find 60 New Species In Suriname Rainforest

Scientists have discovered 60 species of previously unknown plants and animals living in a remote rainforest in southeastern Suriname.

Suriname is a small country on the northeastern coast of South America, just north of Brazil.

It is located in a geographic area called the Guiana Shield, which contains more than one-quarter of the world’s rainforest.

An expedition of 16 field biologists spent three weeks in Suriname in 2012, exploring the remote, mountainous rainforest region.

Thirty indigenous men helped transport their food and equipment by boat and guided team through the forest.

by · November 25, 2013 · Animals, Environment, News, Science
New Ripleys Aquarium In Toronto

New Ripleys Aquarium In Toronto

Toronto has a new landmark–an aquarium.

Nestled in beside the Rogers Centre at the base of the CN Tower, the new Ripleys Aquarium opened last week.

It’s home to more than 16,000 marine animals and 450 species.

There are lots of interactive displays to let kids see and experience the fish.

In the “dangerous lagoon,” visitors board a moving sidewalk which takes them on a slow ride through a 97-metre see-through tunnel filled with 17 sharks and thousands of marine animals. Sea turtles and saw fish swim overhead as visitors file past.

“Touch pools” feature horseshoe crabs, stingrays and bamboo sharks. The pools are shallow, so people can reach in and gently pet the animals.

An exhibit called Planet Jellies houses many different species of colourful jellyfish.

by · October 31, 2013 · Animals, News
Unlocking The Mysteries Of The Monarch Butterfly’s Incredible Journey

Unlocking The Mysteries Of The Monarch Butterfly’s Incredible Journey

Every year, Monarch butterflies fly more than 4,000 kilometres from Canada to Mexico.

Until recently, no-one was sure how the Monarch butterfly knew the exact path to take that would ensure it would end up at its intended destination after such a long flight.

Now Canadian scientists believe they have discovered the secret to the butterfly’s internal sense of direction.

Scientists wanted to know if the Monarchs used a type of “internal compass” or an “internal map.” Some animals and birds have both.

To find out, researchers tested the butterflies by starting them different locations than they normally would. Ryan Norris, an associate professor of biology at the University of Guelph, started them on their journey from Guelph, Ontario and Calgary, Alberta.

by · April 11, 2013 · Animals, Science
Image: Keven Law

Camel Fossils Found In Canada’s Arctic

Scientists have discovered fossilized bone fragments belonging to a prehistoric camel that lived in Canada’s High Arctic about 3.5 million years ago.

The fossils were found on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, in a site near the Strathcona Fiord.

Scientists have also found the fossilized remains of mammals such as bears, beavers and deerlets (small deerlike animals) in this area.

The site is a polar desert now, but during the Pliocene era – the time when the when the camel was alive – it would have been a forest. The average temperature in the Arctic was 14 to 22 degrees warmer then, so it was warm enough for trees to grow, but still cold, snowy and dark for much of the year.

by · April 8, 2013 · Animals, Science