Post Tagged with: "history"

Lejac Residential School at Fraser Lake in 1920. Image: Wikimedia

Residential Schools Hearings Wrap Up

A commission that will document one of the darkest periods in Canada’s history is wrapping up and will report on its findings next year.

Since 2010, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been gathering information from First Nations, Inuit and Metis people who were forced to take part in Canada’s “residential (boarding) schools” program.

by · March 31, 2014 · News, Politics
Saddle Ridge Hoard coins and dirt. Image: Wikipedia

Couple Finds Buried Treasure–In Their Backyard

A husband and wife struck gold last month… in their backyard.

The man and woman were walking their dog on their property in California when the woman noticed a strange looking, rusty can in the ground.

They started digging, and eventually uncovered eight metal cans. The cans were full of gold coins–1,427 of them.

It turns out that the coins are very valuable. In fact, they’re worth more than $10-million.

by · March 23, 2014 · Lighter, News
The chandelier that was created out of the Maple Tree Forever Project. Image: BROTHERS DRESSLER

This Famous Maple Tree Will Live… Forever

In 1867 when Canada was created, a towering Silver Maple tree standing in front of Alexander Muir’s house in Toronto gave him an idea.

He would write a poem and a song about the majestic tree, so common in Canada and so symbolic, to celebrate Canada’s confederation.

His song was called The Maple Leaf Forever and it has been the unofficial Canadian anthem to this day.

by · March 18, 2014 · Arts, Environment, News
A boy votes in a "mock election" outside the Russian embassy in Ottawa. Image: Chrystia Chudczak, www.chrystiachudczak.com.

Crimea Has The World’s Attention

Some events are happening in Crimea and the world is taking notice of them.

The small peninsula of Crimea, attached to the country of Ukraine, sits in the middle of Europe. Crimea is about half the size of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia; about two million people live there.

Crimea is at the centre of a major political battle between Russia and Ukraine. The rest of world is watching that conflict closely.

by · March 18, 2014 · Breaking News, News, Politics
Stonehenge. Image: Frédéric Vincent

Was Stonehenge Built for Prehistoric Rock Music?

For many years, archaeologists have wondered why the people who built Stonehenge – a prehistoric monument in the south of England – used huge rocks that came from more than 300 kilometres away.

Now, a team of researchers believes the rocks may have been chosen because they produce musical sounds.

by · March 16, 2014 · News
Image: Andrijko Z.

How Would You Change The Senate?

What would you do with the Canadian Senate? Change the way Senators are chosen? Get rid of it? Keep it as-is?

The Senate is a legislative body of the government that has almost the same powers as the House of Commons.

However, members to the House of Commons are elected; the prime minister appoints Senators.

And these tend to be people from his own party, who have done good things for his party.

Once they are in the Senate, they almost always vote as their party does in the House of Commons.

The Senate was started this way in 1867 when Canada was formed.

It was supposed to be a place for “sober second thought”—thinking carefully about the laws sent to it by the House of Commons and sometimes improving them.

by · February 5, 2014 · News, Politics
Image: Alphathon

East German Man Receives Contest Prize 45 Years Later

Gunter Zettl won a radio contest in 1969.

He correctly identified a song the radio station played, and he sent a postcard to the station with the name of the song (“Painter Man,” By The Creation).

Last week, 45 years later, he was finally given his prize.

The reason for the delay was political.

Following World War II, in 1945, Germany was seperated into two states: East Germany and West Germany.

At the time, Zettl was a teenager living in East Germany. Pop music was banned in East Germany at the time.

by · January 21, 2014 · News, Politics
Take Our Fun Quiz: 2013 In Review (Part I)

Take Our Fun Quiz: 2013 In Review (Part I)

How much do you know about the news that happened in 2013?

Take our quiz and see how much you remember about these stories from the past year. The link beside each question will take you to the TKN article that will give you the answer.

1) First Nations, Inuit and Metis people came together to form a movement for peaceful protest. What did the group call itself?

2) Chris Hadfield is famous for _____________. (Note: There are many possible correct answers for this one — fill the blank with what you know about Hadfield.)

by · January 5, 2014 · News
Image: Government ZA

“A Great Tree Has Fallen” – Nelson Mandela Laid To Rest

The father of South Africa was laid to rest on Sunday.

Nelson Mandela was an international icon who fought for peace and reconciliation.

During his life, he affected millions of people. He helped bring about the elimination of “apartheid” in South Africa.

Mandela died on December 5 at the age of 95.

On Sunday, he was given a state funeral, in his home village of Qunu, followed by a private graveside ceremony.

by · December 15, 2013 · News, Politics
Pope Francis at Vargihna. Image: Tânia Rêgo/ABr

Pope Francis Chosen As Time’s Person Of The Year

Time Magazine has named Pope Francis its “Person of the Year” for 2013.

The magazine has been handing out the honour each year since 1927.

Time chose the pope “for his strong leadership, humility and concern for the poor.” They said he has “brought new energy to the church.”

On March 13, 2013, the Catholic Church chose Argentinian-born Jorge Mario Bergoglio to be its new pope; he later selected the name Pope Francis.

The pope lives simply, in a modest apartment. He drives around in a 30-year-old vehicle, although he could—as past popes have done—own expensive cars.

Pope Francis, 77, strongly believes in helping the poor.

by · December 11, 2013 · News