Post Tagged with: "history"

Ceremonies Mark 100th Anniversary Of World War I

Ceremonies Mark 100th Anniversary Of World War I

Special events were held around the world in August to mark the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper attended a ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on August 3. He placed a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to honour all soldiers who have fought for Canada.

by · September 1, 2014 · News
Pierre Trudeau in 1968. image: Mickie Boisvert

Inspirational Canadians, Proud Deeds

When the federal government asked Canadians recently who they consider to be Canada’s most inspirational heroes, the answer was probably not what Prime Minister Stephen Harper expected.

by · June 22, 2014 · News, Politics
Washington Redskins logo. Image: Wikipedia

Redskins Trademark Taken Away

The trademark for the name “Redskins” used by the Washington Redskins football team, has been cancelled.

by · June 18, 2014 · News, Sports
A reconstructed skeleton of Argentinosaurus huinculensis, which is in the Titanosaur group. Image: Eva K.

World’s Biggest Dinosaur Found

Scientists have uncovered the fossilized bones of what may be the largest dinosaur that ever existed.

by · May 22, 2014 · Animals, News
Ancient Egyptian Sarcophagus; Image: Buffalo Museum of Science

Canadian Scientist Loves Mummies

Heather Gill-Frerking is a Canadian scientist who loves working with mummies.

Mummies are the preserved bodies of humans and animals.

Gill-Frerking is the director of science and education for the “Mummies of the World” exhibition at the Buffalo Museum of Science.

by · April 22, 2014 · News
Lejac Residential School at Fraser Lake in 1920. Image: Wikimedia

Residential Schools Hearings Wrap Up

A commission that will document one of the darkest periods in Canada’s history is wrapping up and will report on its findings next year.

Since 2010, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been gathering information from First Nations, Inuit and Metis people who were forced to take part in Canada’s “residential (boarding) schools” program.

by · March 31, 2014 · News, Politics
Saddle Ridge Hoard coins and dirt. Image: Wikipedia

Couple Finds Buried Treasure–In Their Backyard

A husband and wife struck gold last month… in their backyard.

The man and woman were walking their dog on their property in California when the woman noticed a strange looking, rusty can in the ground.

They started digging, and eventually uncovered eight metal cans. The cans were full of gold coins–1,427 of them.

It turns out that the coins are very valuable. In fact, they’re worth more than $10-million.

by · March 23, 2014 · Lighter, News
The chandelier that was created out of the Maple Tree Forever Project. Image: BROTHERS DRESSLER

This Famous Maple Tree Will Live… Forever

In 1867 when Canada was created, a towering Silver Maple tree standing in front of Alexander Muir’s house in Toronto gave him an idea.

He would write a poem and a song about the majestic tree, so common in Canada and so symbolic, to celebrate Canada’s confederation.

His song was called The Maple Leaf Forever and it has been the unofficial Canadian anthem to this day.

by · March 18, 2014 · Arts, Environment, News
A boy votes in a "mock election" outside the Russian embassy in Ottawa. Image: Chrystia Chudczak, www.chrystiachudczak.com.

Crimea Has The World’s Attention

Some events are happening in Crimea and the world is taking notice of them.

The small peninsula of Crimea, attached to the country of Ukraine, sits in the middle of Europe. Crimea is about half the size of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia; about two million people live there.

Crimea is at the centre of a major political battle between Russia and Ukraine. The rest of world is watching that conflict closely.

by · March 18, 2014 · Breaking News, News, Politics
Stonehenge. Image: Frédéric Vincent

Was Stonehenge Built for Prehistoric Rock Music?

For many years, archaeologists have wondered why the people who built Stonehenge – a prehistoric monument in the south of England – used huge rocks that came from more than 300 kilometres away.

Now, a team of researchers believes the rocks may have been chosen because they produce musical sounds.

by · March 16, 2014 · News