Author: Julia Mohamed

A New Aquarium For Toronto?
Animals Entertainment

A New Aquarium For Toronto?

Toronto has a huge sports stadium, a science centre and great museums. But there’s one attraction it doesn’t have, that some big cities have—a large aquarium.

Now, an aquarium may be built in Toronto. If it is approved by the City Council, it could be ready by July 2015.

The aquarium would be in a large building. It could include many thousands of fish and marine animals including sharks. One idea is to have a jellyfish room with special lighting and mirrors to make it look very exciting. Another idea is for a tunnel that people could walk through to see the fish swimming around and above them.

This woman's sign has a checklist: Tunisia and Egypt, two countries going through similar situations, are checked off.
Breaking News Politics

Toronto Celebrates With Egypt

People in Toronto are celebrating the news that Hosni Mubarak has stepped down as president of Egypt. Hundreds of anti-Mubarak protesters gathered in Toronto’s Yonge-Dundas Square last Friday to celebrate.

When Egypt’s vice-president, Omar Suleiman, told the people on Friday that the president would step down and end his 30-year ruling, everyone got very excited. Many people in Egypt had been gathering in the streets of Cairo to ask Mubarak to quit as president.

Thousands Honour Sgt. Ryan Russell
News

Thousands Honour Sgt. Ryan Russell

On Jan. 18, more than 12,000 people from across Canada and the United States attended the funeral of Sgt. Ryan Russell in Toronto. Police, emergency workers and thousands of Toronto residents came to honour Sgt. Russell’s memory and support his wife, Christine and their son, Nolan.

Sgt. Russell died in the line of duty, trying to stop a runaway snowplow. His death affected so many people, even those who had never met him. When a police officer dies, everyone cares.

Young African Pianist Achieves His Dreams
Arts Entertainment

Young African Pianist Achieves His Dreams

As a boy, Mehdi Ghazi had a dream. He wanted to be a classical pianist.

But he lived in Algeria, a northern African nation torn apart by a long-standing civil war between government forces and Islamic rebels. The war had shut down the music conservatory. And western classical music was nearly unheard of there—in fact, some called it “the devil’s music.”

Ghazi had no piano. He practiced on a keyboard drawn on a sheet of paper. And he had no teacher, so he taught himself to play.