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9/11 Victims Honoured, Remembered

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Barack Obama at tenth anniversary of 9/11; image: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
U.S. President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and former U.S. President George W. Bush at the 9/11 memorial at Ground Zero. Image: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday was the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

“9/11” refers to three terrorist attacks in the United States that occurred on September 11, 2001 – the ninth month, the 11th day.

On that day 10 years ago, nearly 3,000 people were killed when terrorists attacked two World Trade Centre buildings in New York and the Pentagon in Washington DC. Near Pennsylvania, a plane was hijacked and crashed into a field.

The victims of the attacks were from more than 90 countries. Around the world, millions of people commemorated 9/11 in their own way.

At the site in New York where the twin towers once stood, called Ground Zero, thousands of people including U.S. President Barack Obama attended remembrance services. Bells rang and there were moments of silence so people could think about the people who died in the attacks and the heroes—including members of the New York Fire and Police Departments—who worked tirelessly to save others that day.

In Canada, hundreds of people gathered at a hockey arena in Gander, N.L., where U.S. Ambassador David Jacobson thanked the town’s residents for generously helping the nearly seven thousand Americans who had been stranded there for three days 10 years ago. (Their flights had been cancelled to keep the airspace clear).

British Prime Minister David Cameron and the relatives of 67 British people who died in the 9/11 attacks, attended a ceremony in London. An American flag at the U.S. embassy in London flew at half-mast.

Mourners in Tokyo, Japan, gathered in front of a glass case containing steel retrieved from Ground Zero. They honoured 23 Fuji Bank employees who died in the World Trade Centre.

There was an emotional ceremony in Australia. The country’s prime minister said, “on this day, on behalf of millions of Australians, I say this: We do not forget. We never forget.”

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
By Jonathan Tilly

Writing/Discussion Prompt
Australia’s Prime Minister expressed the importance of never forgetting the events that took place on 9/11. Why do you think it is important to remember this event and what are the dangers of forgetting?

Reading Prompt
What do you know about 9/11? Where did you first learn about it? What questions do you still have?

Primary
Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them(OME, Reading: 1.6).

Junior
Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them (OME, Reading: 1.6).

Intermediate
Extend understanding of texts, including increasingly complex or difficult texts, by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them(OME, Reading: 1.6).

Grammar Feature: Spelling (double consonants)
Certain words are harder than others to spell. As a result, they’re often misspelled–by kids and adults alike. “Difficult” words often have double consonants. For example, today’s article includes the often misspelled word, “commemorate.” In order to become a better speller, it is important to memorize words with double consonants.

Here are some other commonly misspelled double consonant words:
millennium, different, pollution, opportunity, recess, soccer, attention.

On the lines below, write 10 different words that include double consonants:
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