Entertainment

Pink Floyd – And Regent Park School Kids

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Ever wanted to be a rock star?

Twenty-five kids from the Regent Park School of Music in Toronto are going to get a chance to sing with one of the biggest rock stars ever, Roger Waters formerly from the band Pink Floyd.

They’re going to sing the children’s chorus in the famous rock song “Another Brick in the Wall (Part II).” And, they’ll be singing at the ACC (Air Canada Centre) in front of thousands of people.

Waters’ rock promoter called the school out of the blue last week and asked if they had 10 to 15 students who would be interested in singing in the concert.

The kids haven’t had much time to rehearse. They got copies of the lyrics and a link to a YouTube video so they could practice. Their first real practice will be on the bus on the way to the concert, the school’s music director says.

The kids weren’t even born when the song became famous (in 1979). But their parents know what a big hit it was and are probably even more excited than the kids.

The song is generally seen to be anti-education. It has a famous line that goes, “We don’t need no education. We don’t need no thought control.” The school’s principal hopes the kids don’t take that message to heart. He says performing at a big venue like the ACC will help to boost the kids’ self-esteem.

The concerts are at the ACC this week on Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday nights.

Related links
A YouTube video of the original “Another Brick in the Wall (Part II).” The children’s chorus starts at 1:19.

Educators – make sure to search for “Part II” because the first part of the song/video contains images that may not be suitable for children (scary).

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS

Writing/Discussion Prompt
If you could sing a song with a famous musician any place in the world what song would you chose and where would you sing it? Describe what that experience would be like.

Reading Prompt
All readers use different strategies before, during, and after they read to help them understand what they read.

What questions did you ask yourself before, during, and after reading to make sure you understood this article?

Primary
Identify, initially with some support and direction, what strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading and how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers (OME, Reading: 4.1).

Junior
Identify the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading and explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers or in a reader’s notebook, how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers (OME, Reading: 4.1).

Grammar Feature: Acronyms
An acronym is a word made up from the first letters in other words. Todays article includes the acronym ACC. This means Air Canada Centre. Writers use acronyms in order to keep their stories short and easy to read.

Can you think of any other acronyms? Can you make up any of your own?